Human-AI co-creativity: Affordances and challenges of using generative AI as a tool for creative problem-solving

V Regis, R Moylan: Philosophizing algorithms: An interactive exploration of our relationships with technology. 24.03.2023.

Abstract

We live in the age of algorithms (Head et al., 2020). Most of the elements of our everyday lives are shaped by algorithmic systems. By selecting the news we read, the people we interact with online, the products we buy and the prices we pay, the music we listen to, the films we watch, and the routes we take, algorithms are increasingly ubiquitous. Notably, this omnipresence runs primarily unnoticed (Hargittai et al., 2020). Algorithms are invisible, which has enabled them to silently take control of the whole network of apparatuses surrounding our present ways of being in the world.

Algorithms are a major force in our postdigital (Jandrić et al., 2018) reality, contributing to the blurring boundaries between the analog and the digital, and the biological and the informational. Turkle (1984/2005) conceptualized computers as “marginal objects on the boundary between the physical and the psychological” (1984/2005, p. 34), causing these limits’ reconceptualization. Considering the unnoticed omnipresence described above, one can imagine algorithms silently influencing these boundaries and reshaping our understandings of humanity.

As humans and algorithms permanently shape and are shaped by each other, we are entangled in complicated and ever-changing relationships (Dogruel, 2021). We must help our children, young people, and teachers reflect on the dynamic relationship we maintain with these abstract entities. Given this complexity, we offer participants a framework to organize complicated conversations (Pinar, 2012) concerning the nature and consequences of this relationship. Inspired by MacDowell and Petrina’s (2021) invitation to investigate children’s and youth’s philosophical perspectives on media and technology (M&T), this framework (Regis, 2022) is based on wonder, emergent questions, critique, and metaphysical discussions.

Through an interactive workshop, we propose an open discussion about algorithms. We will engage workshop participants in a thought-provoking, open dialogue based on a sequence of questions aligned with our framework and questions that emerge through our conversation. After the discussion, the framework will be briefly presented, followed by an explanation of how algorithms have been conceptualized in educational literature.

    BibTeX (Download)

    @misc{nokey,
    title = {Philosophizing algorithms: An interactive exploration of our relationships with technology},
    author = {V Regis and R Moylan},
    year  = {2023},
    date = {2023-03-24},
    institution = {University of British Columbia},
    organization = {10th Educational Graduate Students Conference},
    abstract = {We live in the age of algorithms (Head et al., 2020). Most of the elements of our everyday lives are shaped by algorithmic systems. By selecting the news we read, the people we interact with online, the products we buy and the prices we pay, the music we listen to, the films we watch, and the routes we take, algorithms are increasingly ubiquitous. Notably, this omnipresence runs primarily unnoticed (Hargittai et al., 2020). Algorithms are invisible, which has enabled them to silently take control of the whole network of apparatuses surrounding our present ways of being in the world.
     
    Algorithms are a major force in our postdigital (Jandrić et al., 2018) reality, contributing to the blurring boundaries between the analog and the digital, and the biological and the informational. Turkle (1984/2005) conceptualized computers as “marginal objects on the boundary between the physical and the psychological” (1984/2005, p. 34), causing these limits’ reconceptualization. Considering the unnoticed omnipresence described above, one can imagine algorithms silently influencing these boundaries and reshaping our understandings of humanity.
     
    As humans and algorithms permanently shape and are shaped by each other, we are entangled in complicated and ever-changing relationships (Dogruel, 2021). We must help our children, young people, and teachers reflect on the dynamic relationship we maintain with these abstract entities. Given this complexity, we offer participants a framework to organize complicated conversations (Pinar, 2012) concerning the nature and consequences of this relationship. Inspired by MacDowell and Petrina’s (2021) invitation to investigate children’s and youth’s philosophical perspectives on media and technology (M&T), this framework (Regis, 2022) is based on wonder, emergent questions, critique, and metaphysical discussions.
     
    Through an interactive workshop, we propose an open discussion about algorithms. We will engage workshop participants in a thought-provoking, open dialogue based on a sequence of questions aligned with our framework and questions that emerge through our conversation. After the discussion, the framework will be briefly presented, followed by an explanation of how algorithms have been conceptualized in educational literature.},
    keywords = {algorithm, Algorithm Literacy, Philosophy of Technology},
    pubstate = {forthcoming},
    tppubtype = {presentation}
    }
    
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